Accessibility

Wheelchair moves hands-free

OGO a handsfree Wheelchair

OGO – Now we’re talking!

Ogo1A wheelchair known as the OGO is currently not yet released to the public but it has a lot of people with mobility challenges excited. This wheelchair moves hands-free. That’s right NO hands are required to propel this device. The OGO designed by Kevin Halsall, an engineer from New Zealand, has used Segway technology to build a hands-free wheelchair.

Similar to a Segway it allows the onboard user to move intuitively, only in the case of this wheelchair it moves by the users’ core (abdominal) muscles – which is excellent therapy in of itself.

Wheelchair moves hands-free

The current prototype version can go as fast as 20kms and it’s (2) lithium-based battery life can last up to approx 30kms. It has the ability to swap out tires for different terrains (great for the outdoorsy type of folks) and because it is hands-free people can play sports or perform other tasks while moving.

The Ogo can also be steered manually and it has seat stabilizers, which is needed for moving up or down inclines, but it does not climb stairs or wash dishes.

At this stage of the game, the Ogo is a finalist in the National Innovators Awards and is in the process of being produced as a commercialized product.

Halsall was inspired to invent this wheelchair when one of his close friends was injured and became a paraplegic due to a skiing accident. His hope is to make this device available and affordable for those who would benefit from it. Although a cost cannot be officially determined it may fall somewhere between $10 – $20,000.

It is an exciting invention, to say the least.

Ogo3

To learn more go HERE

Watch this video –

Sharing is caring...

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Access is a right
...not a privilege

Access by definition means right of entry. Now that you know a little bit about my access needs, use me as a benchmark. Look around and ask, how accessible is this building, venue, home, office, city, town, country – could Susan and others with disabilities enter with ease?

Recent Accessibility Posts

Recent Lifesmarts Posts

Recent Podcasts

Start a mini-marathon!

Sign up for our Newsletter

We hate spam, yuck, and promise not to pester you very often. 

Scroll to Top